Not HIIT with Best Shot at KORE Method

When I heard there was a swank new HIIT studio (with chilled, eucalyptus-infused towels!) in the trendiest of hoods,  I booked a session on FitReserve and headed to Kore on West 13th Street.

I was primed for intensity, hopeful for a dark, clubby vibe with killer tunes. The room was dark. It was also spartan, the only equipment being TRX straps, kettle balls, and bands. They boast a 5 step-format HIIT workout (high-intensity interval training) that targets strength and cardio without the treadmill. After some active stretching, the highlight of the workout is the 8-minute series of high-rep body weight strength and stability movements.

While the trainer was knowledgable and encouraging, and the method mixes up such a variety of movements that I was never bored, the intensity was not much higher than a shetland pony, and the music was less than memorable.

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That said, I did break a sweat and was challenged by the kick-ups (in which several classmates made it to hand stand). Many of the moves were original and creative– not just a bunch of burpees, which I liked. It was kind of like boot-camp meets pilates with some kettle-balls and TRX thrown in. While I won’t be putting them on my regular workout rotation, it was an above-average workout.

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And sure, there were the fancy skin care products, and the chilled eucalyptus towels, but there was only one bathroom. The lobby was cramped enough to bump into 6 people while trying to remove my coat. I opted not to try out the showers to avoid the closet-like “locker” room.

The short story:

Kore New York

Meatpacking District, 336 W 13th St, New York, NY 10014

Pros: Interesting workout with great instructors. Small group format. Chilled eucalyptus towels and free lockers. Dark room, loud music. Some challenging and origianl moves.

Cons: Not as high-intensity as they claim. Trying to be too cool. Teeny-tiny lobby and even smaller locker room/bathroom.

 

 

Flirting with FitReserve

I’m still using ClassPass. A Lot. (4-5 times a week which means I’m probably one of the people they are not making much money on). But, I’m also flirting with the competition. FitReserve reached out and offered me a deal to try them out, and so I have.

On the surface it’s really hard to compete with ClassPass’s simplicity: $99=classes at hundreds of studios in the city (unlimited number of workouts, but only 3 at any one studio per month).

Here’s the catch. There are so many ClassPass members that it’s getting harder and harder to book spots at the most popular studios. I’ve seen the words “No Spots” enough to want to cry.

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Their new cancellation policy which punishes you more for not showing up ($20) than for canceling less than 12 hours in advance ($15) has helped to free up more last minute spots. So even if you’re not consistently free at noon everyday to sit by your computer and hope for a coveted spot when the booking-window bell rings, you can check the schedule last-minute to see if people have canceled their spots. There’s much more last-minute movement than before. That said, I still spend an inordinate amount of time trying to schedule, book, and re-book classes. (Sometimes this is worth it, like today when I happened to scroll across the words Barry’s Bootcamp with a friendly purple Reserve button next to them!)

There are still plenty of choices to stay in shape on ClassPass, even if they’re not my first choices. But, I have found FitReserve‘s promise of being able to book classes at hot spots in convenient time slots to hold true. It is rare to see the “Sold Out” button on FitReserve’s website. In general, I’d have to say FitReserve’s website is better. It’s clearer with bigger font, easier filtering options, and simple navigation. (I do wish they’d offer the same kind of easy, add-to-calendar feature when you get the reservation confirmation pop-up though.)

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Another one of their claims to better-ness is their partner discount offers. Some of them seem pretty good, and I might check out Zeel, massage on-demand and Bestowed healthy snacks. I’m not sold on these partner offers being much of a perk though. You can often find the same sorts of deals on your own.

So far I like FitReserve quite a bit. The biggest drawback is that they don’t have as many participating studios as ClassPass and their lowest-cost membership option only allows you 10 classes per month and it’s still a bit pricer than ClassPass’s $99. If they can get a bigger roster of studios, and maybe open that up to 12 classes a month (which would let you workout at 3 days a week), I think it might be worth switching.

Here’s an older post with more deets on the differences.

I’m getting pretty spoiled this month using both. If money isn’t an issue, you don’t have to choose. You could have the best of both fitness worlds.

Off the Beaten (aka Overbooked) ClassPass Path

ClassPass’s new cancellation policy is so much better than the old one! With the 12-hour window, rather 24, I’m able to make adjustments in my schedule more easily which is often a necessity having a preschool-age kiddo. More importantly, because there’s more of a penalty for no-showing ($20) versus late canceling ($15), there’s a bit more of a chance you can book a sought-after class last-minute. Bit being the operative word. Many studios don’t allow last-minute booking though and I’ve still got my alarm set in hopes of getting another date with Barry.

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I’ve decided (thanks to a special rate offer) to also try out FitReserve this month in hopes of getting into some of the classes I just can’t seem to book on ClassPass as that is what FitReserve claims is what sets them apart: you can book harder to book classes at popular times, and you can go to each studio 4 rather than 3 times a month. I’m not giving up ClassPass yet though. For now, I’m just cheating on them a little with FitReserve. But alas, that still doesn’t mean more Barry’s Bootcamp in my life as they don’t have Barry on their roster yet. If they manage to get the new OrangeTheory Fitness that’s opening up in Chelsea, I’d switch over for good.

In the meantime, I’ve been talking to other class hoppers to get ideas about fun studios to book that are actually book-able. Here are a few of the best, less-discovered studios I’ve found. If you know of more, please share!

  • As One (Columbus Circle): HIIT-style total body workout
  • EVF Performance (Upper East Side and Columbus Circle locations): Offers CrossFit and HIIT-style classes, total body workout
  • Crank (Upper East Side and LIC locations): I can’t believe I haven’t done a whole post about this place yet. It’s one of my favorite indoor cycling spots because it’s the closest I’ve ever come to getting a total body workout on the bike, they provide shoes and the teachers are awesome!
  • Revolution in Motion (Garment District): A revolutionary approach to total body training, like nothing I’ve ever done before.
  • Revolve (Union Square): Loved this indoor cycling class too, especially the hour-long RIP class that incorporates more upper body.

Another ClassPass Competitor: Move USA

One of the most fun parts of my post-workout has become chatting with other studio go-ers about ClassPass. It’s how I find out about the most popular workouts, and hopefully about some awesome workouts that are less popular so there’s more of a chance I can book one. I’m a HUGE fan of ClassPass, but as their membership increases, it’s getting harder and harder to book coveted spots at places like Barry’s Bootcamp or Exceed (which I still haven’t tried). I now have an alarm set on my phone to go off everyday just before noon in hopes of booking one of those spots. It’s why more ClassPass competitors are cropping up, like FitReserve which promises you can book seats more easily and offers discounts on things like massage and nutrition services.

Talking with fellow yogis at NY Loves Yoga the other day, I learned of a new interesting competitor: MoveUSA. Looks like they offer quite a few studios in NYC as well as in other major cities (including some international locations). Like FitReserve, their homepage says that members get discounts on complementary acitivities like massage, but I found it hard to get more information about that, and in general found their website a little confusing and cumbersome. They have 4 major price plans (some less than and some more than ClassPass’s simple $99/month rate), and then it also looks like there are other “premium” studios for which they charge an additional $10 per class.

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One thing that seems cool about them is that they have a few more “open gym” partnerships, like with the JCC on the Upper West Side which also includes access to their swimming pool. That’s something I’ve been missing with ClassPass— swim access, but access to NYC pools is fairly cheap through NYParks and Rec. MoveUSA has partnerships with many of the same gyms as ClassPass including Barry’s and Exceed, but not some of my other favorites like BFX, Brick, and Exhale Spa.

Screen Shot 2015-02-23 at 12.43.34 PMBecause of that, I’m still choosing ClassPass over MoveUSA or FitReserve. However, if I can’t get to Barry’s at least a couple times a month, I may consider switching to FitReserve (cause I’d really like to check out Clay Helath Club) or buying a class package directly at a couple of studios.

Any readers want to share their experiences with either MoveUSA or FitReserve?

ClassPass just got some competition

Look what popped up on my Facebook feed: Screen Shot 2014-12-28 at 8.36.50 PM(an ad, of course),

but an ad about some competition for ClassPass, a service that also offers a way to access fitness, dance, rowing, strength training, pilates, and yoga studios all over the city.

It’s called FitReserve, and its website is almost identical in appearance to ClassPass. Like ClassPass, you have to provide your e-mail address and “request an invite” to sign-up. Unlike ClassPass, FitReserve claims to offer access to “peak class times” that can sometimes get filled up before being offered on ClassPass. FitReserve is only in NYC right now, and while it doesn’t have as many studios on its list yet, it does offer access to a couple different ones like Clay Health Club and Spa, as well as offering discounts with partners like Instacart grocery delivery, Bestowed healthy snacks service, and Zeel massage on demand. It’s also a bit more expensive. $149/month gets you 10 classes a month and $249/month gets you 20.

For now, I’m planning to stick with ClassPass, but I’ll be watching to see if FitReserve partner deals and studio access are too tempting to pass up. If Soul Cylce or The Class suddenly deigns to offer classes with them, I’d pay the extra fifty bucks in a heartbeat.

Here’s a breakdown on what I see as the differences between the two:

ClassPass:

  • $99/month for unlimited classes at over 300 studios in New York metro area
  • offered in 14 major cities
  • 3 classes per studio each month
  • no included discounts with affiliated partners
  • can be hard to book classes at peak hours for hot studios like Exceed

FitReserve

  • $149/month for 10 classes, $249 for 20 classes at over 70 studios (so far) in NYC
  • offered only in NYC Metro area (so far)
  • 4 classes per studio each month
  • incudes discounts with affiliated partners on things like clothing, healthy snacks and massage
  • access to all classes at included studios, even during peak hours